Rhino in the Waterberg

The Waterberg is one of the most significant conservation areas for rhino in South Africa, and is home to the second largest concentration of rhino populations, next to the Kruger National Park, with approximately 1 250 white and black rhino remaining in the Waterberg Biosphere Reserve.
The Waterberg habitat is suitable for white and black rhino and is historically an important place for the recovery of the species.
It is therefore critical that rhinos remain within this area, and so Save the Waterberg Rhino, is at the forefront of trying to save this last frontier for the rhino. With our national parks under siege by poachers, Waterberg’s rhino population is vital to the survival of the species.

Save The Waterberg Rhino

Save the Waterberg Rhino was started in November 2012 by Tessa and Ant Baber and Victoria Crake. Tessa and Ant own a reserve in the Waterberg Biosphere Reserve of South Africa. They were devastated in November 2011 when one of their white rhino cows was poached together with her 11 month old baby. At the end of July 2012 another of their white rhino cows were poached and on this occasion her 18 month old calf managed to escape.

Although security was increased after the first poaching incident in 2011, they were struck again.  It was then that they realised that the only way for rhinos to be safe guarded against poaching would be a complete community collective approach throughout the Waterberg district.

Save the Waterberg Rhino is a registered Not for Profit Organisation, headed up by a board comprised of key role-players and clear governance policies and procedures.

The collective experience of the board  is invaluable in helping to achieve the aims and objectives set out by Save  The Waterberg Rhino. Save the Waterberg Rhino was started in November 2012 by Tessa and Ant Baber and Victoria Crake. Tessa and Ant own a reserve in the Waterberg Biosphere Reserve of South Africa. They were devastated in November 2011 when one of their white rhino cows was poached together with her 11 month old baby. At the end of July 2012 another of their white rhino cows were poached and on this occasion her 18 month old calf managed to escape.

Although security was increased after the first poaching incident in 2011, they were struck again.  It was then that they realised that the only way for rhinos to be safe guarded against poaching would be a complete community collective approach throughout the Waterberg district.

Save the Waterberg Rhino is a registered Not for Profit Organisation, headed up by a board comprised of key role-players and clear governance policies and procedures.

The collective experience of the board  is invaluable in helping to achieve the aims and objectives set out by Save  The Waterberg Rhino.